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Illinois Supreme Court history: Seneca dog bite case

While defending a client in an assault and battery case by claiming self-defense, Abraham Lincoln told the jury about a farmer’s unruly dog who unexpectedly attacked a man who happened to be holding a pitchfork. When the dog lunged at the man, he defended himself with the pitchfork and killed the dog. When he heard the commotion, the farmer rushed to the scene and demanded to know, “What made you kill my dog?”

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Illinois Supreme Court History: Fingerprints

When Thomas Jennings broke into several houses in Chicago’s Morgan Park neighborhood on the night of September 9, 1910, he was unaware one of the houses had a freshly painted porch. After grabbing ahold of the porch railing, Jennings left four fingerprints, which were later used in court as evidence to convict him of the murder of Clarence Hiller — the first case of its kind in the United States.

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